Safety Tips for Cyclists

Safety Tips for Cyclists

Cycling safety has become a major concern on the South Africa roads as there has been a significant increase in the number of fatal road crashes and accidents involving cyclists.

Competitions are well organized and there is careful attention to safety details – it is however during training that cyclists must deal with the dangers caused by other road users, harsh conditions of nature and the perils of bad road conditions.

The following tips will enhance cycling safety:

  • Always ensure that your bike is in good repair.
  •  Always wear cycling helmets to prevent head injuries. Head injuries cause a high percentage of all cycling deaths – much of which can be prevented by wearing a helmet.
  • Replace any damaged helmets for maximum protection. Helmets must fit properly to be safe. When the straps and comfort pads are adjusted, the helmet should not move forward, backward, or come off. It should sit level on the head and extend down to about two fingers (3 cm) above the eyebrows. Chin straps should be snug without pinching, and the front and rear straps should meet just below each ear when tightly adjusted.
  • Helmets only work once. If a helmet has been in a collision that required the inner lining to absorb shock, buy another one! Even though the damage may not be visible, the shock absorbing qualities may be deadened.
  •  Wear eyewear to protect eyes from dirt, wind and bugs.
  •  Wear reflective and fluorescent clothing suitable for the weather and time of day that will help other road users to see you.
  •  Obey the rules of the road and know what each traffic sign means.
  •  Ride with the flow of traffic, not against it.
  •  Watch out for surface conditions like potholes and debris.
  •  Never ride your bike through puddles, there may be hazards hidden beneath the water that you can’t see.
  •  Allow ample time to inform vehicles behind of your intention to turn either left or right with hand signals.
  •  Keep both hands on the handlebars unless signalling.
  •  Avoid swerving left and right on the road, ride in a straight line.
  •  Avoid speeding behind a moving vehicle, if it brakes sharply there could be a collision.
  •  Pedestrians should be given priority always, remember that some of them may be partially sighted or deaf and may not be aware of your presence.
  •  Avoid carrying any load that will affect your balance and centre of gravity.
  •  On hot summer days, wear sunscreen and carry water to prevent dehydration.

Cyclists are encouraged to wear an emergency bracelet. There have been several cyclists that owe their lives to the fact that they were wearing an identification bracelet or some other means of identification. This is very important info for medics to have when treating an injured cyclist as they are often unconscious or incoherent in an accident.

Source: http://www.arrivealive.co.za

24/7 Security Services – info@24-7security.co.za / 011 444 2237

Home Safety For Seniors

Home Safety For Seniors

It’s no surprise that most of the elderly prefer to remain in their homes and within their communities as they grow older. Here are some simple and effective senior safety tips to make your home secure for your elderly loved ones:

  • Declutter your house to make sure you have plenty of space to walk around. Less clutter also means less risk of falls.
  • Make sure all rugs have anti-slipping pads.
  • Cover furniture corners to prevent injuries if you accidentally bump into them.
  • Make sure every room has proper lighting, including walk-in closets. Use a nightlight to make it easy to see at night.
  • If your home has different floor levels, use proper markings and make sure they are visible.
  • To prevent fall risks, use cord covers for all cords and cables, or secure them out of the way.
  • Use handrails for all staircases.
  • Remove all carpets from stairs and staircases to prevent slipping.
  • Pay attention to the height of your bed: if your feet can’t touch the floor while sitting on the bed, it means your bed is too high. Try lowering it by removing your box spring. Similarly, if your knees are higher than your hips while sitting, it means your bed is too low. In this case, try adding a box spring.
  • Place a light (such as a lamp) close to your bed and make sure you can reach it easily.
  • Have all the items that you use frequently within easy reach in the kitchen – don’t place them on high shelves that are hard to access.
  • Install grab bars in your bathroom for safety.
  • Use rubber mats in your shower or bathtub to prevent slipping.
  • If you have a water boiler, don’t set the thermostat to “Hot”. Instead, use the “Medium” setting to avoid burns or scalding.
  • Check your faucets and make sure they are easy to turn on and off.
  • Make sure all electrical equipment around the house works properly. Service your appliances every 3-6 months. Many seniors keep important medication in their refrigerators, so it’s important to make sure they are in good working condition. If you have a clothes dryer, make sure the vents are cleaned by a professional, to prevent risk of fire.
  • Check to ensure that your kitchen counters are easy for you to reach. If they are too high, it’s a good idea to lower them to a more accessible height.
  • Avoid stepping on wet or damp surfaces – promptly clean up any spills on the floor.
  • Have a cordless phone at home and keep it within easy reach, to prevent having to rush to answer when the phone rings.
  • Do not mix cleaning products together – some substances may be extremely dangerous when combined.
  • Wear anti-slip slippers or socks when walking around your home, especially on slippery surfaces such as polished hardwood floors or tiles.
  • Consider purchasing a medical alert device.

24/7 Security Services – info@24-7security.co.za / 011 444 2237

Power Outage Safety Tips

Power Outage Safety Tips

When the power is out, it could take your alarm, and other security features down with it. Here are some tips for keeping safe when the power is down.

Alarm Batteries
Make sure all batteries are charged and working. An alarms’ backup battery will power the system for eight hours on average. However, this is dependent on several factors such as how many devices are linked to the panel, the age of the battery and how many power failures or power spikes are experienced in the area. Power outages can dramatically reduce the lifespan of the alarm battery.

Electric Fence
Ensure that your electric fence continues to function during power outages. Your electric fence battery should have a backup battery.

Generators
If you are using a generator, never operate it anywhere inside your home, including the garage or any confined area, as it produces carbon monoxide which can be fatal.

Arriving/Leaving Home

Ensure that you are especially alert when arriving or leaving your home in the evenings, as the street lights and your outside lighting may not be functioning during power outages. Keep a torch in your car.

At Home

  • Ensure that all automated gates and doors are secured and that all other gates and doors are locked.
  • With candles, gas and other lighting devices being used more often, these can result in an increased fire hazard. Therefore, home fire extinguishers should be on hand.
  • Install battery operated lights in strategic places in your home.
  • Keep the keys to motorised gates in an accessible location and have good quality padlocks available to use as a backup.
  • Programme your security provider number in your cell phone in case of emergency.
  • Keep your cell phone fully charged.

24/7 Security Services – info@24-7security.co.za / 011 444 2237

Safety Tips For Woman

Safety Tips For Woman

Don’t ever worry about whether you are overreacting or being over-cautious. If you think something is out of place, make a call to the authorities. It’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Use your sixth sense. “Sixth sense” or “gut instinct” – whatever you call it, your intuition is a powerful subconscious insight into situations and people. All of us, especially women, have this gift, but very few of us pay attention to it. Learn to trust this power and use it to your full advantage. Avoid a person or a situation which does not “feel” safe – you’re probably right.

Safety when using public transport

  • Don’t haul out wads of cash while paying for your fare.
  • Don’t wear very expensive brand-name clothing, particularly if you have a long or secluded walk from your taxi-stop to your destination.
  • Wear practical shoes if you can, as apart from being comfortable, they make you more capable of dealing with a potential threat when walking to and from the taxi/bus/train stop. Carry the
    pretty shoes in your bag.
  • Don’t commute while under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Safety when using an ATM

  • When you’re by yourself, avoid using an ATM in out-of-the-way or deserted areas. Use ATMs located inside banks or supermarkets where other people are around. Use ATMs in well-lit, public
  • Be aware of your surroundings when withdrawing funds. If you notice anything out of the ordinary, come back later or use another ATM.
  • If it looks like someone has tampered with the ATM equipment, don’t use it. It could mean that a criminal has attached a “skimmer” to the ATM.
  • When typing in your pin, cover the keypad so others can’t see what you are typing.
  • After completing your transaction, remember to remove your card, cash and any printed documents such as receipts or statements.
  • Put your money and ATM card away before you leave the ATM. Always avoid showing your cash.
  • Take your receipts with you so that potential criminals will not know how much you withdrew or how much money is in your account.

Safety when driving

  • When stopping in traffic, leave enough space to pull out from behind the car in front of you.
  • Lock all doors and roll up the windows while you drive.
  • Keep your valuables – laptop, handbag, gym bag, mobile phone – out of sight.
  • Never give lifts to strangers.
  • If you suspect that you are being followed, drive to the nearest police station or busy place to get help.
  • Avoid distractions while driving, tempting as it may be to check phone messages or update Facebook and Twitter while in traffic, your phone should be off every time you turn on the ignition.
  • Always park in a central, well-lit place, preferably where there are attendants on duty or people passing by.
  • Hold your keys in your hand as you approach your parked car. Don’t wait until you reach the car to search for them in your purse. Experts say you’re most vulnerable when you are getting
    into or out of your vehicle.
  • When approaching your vehicle, regardless of where you have parked it, always walk around the vehicle to check for any irregularities.
  • Wait until you’re close to the car before unlocking it, and if the car design allows it, unlock the driver’s door only.
  • Never leave your car door open with the engine running when you are opening your gate or garage door. When using electric gates and doors always keep your car doors locked until you are
    safely inside.
  • If you stay in a secure complex with security guards, do not be fooled into thinking you are safe. You can easily be followed into your complex so always remain vigilant. Research shows
    that most people relax the closer they get to home, and this is often when they are most vulnerable.
  • Don’t leave the remote control that opens your home’s electric gate in your car.
  • Don’t be a victim of car-jamming! When you press your remote-control button, make sure that you hear the beep of your alarm activating and see or hear the locks clicking into place.
  • Always check your door handle before leaving the car.

24/7 Security Services – info@24-7security.co.za / 011 444 2237

Domestic Worker Safety

Domestic Worker Safety

Domestic workers play an integral part in any home security system, and it is critical that they are empowered and equipped to look after their own safety, as well as the safety of anyone else on the property such as children they may be looking after.

It is important that domestic workers are alert at all times:

  • When alone at home, cleaning or working, make sure that all doors and windows are closed and locked.
  • Do not allow anyone onto the property before confirming with the homeowner that they are expected, for example, electricians, meter readers, Telkom technicians, etc.
  • Do not go out to the gate when someone is on the intercom or calling, rather talk over the intercom or through a window from inside the house.
  • Be careful when putting out or fetching rubbish bins. Look around for any suspicious people and close and lock the gate immediately.
  • Be careful when hanging up or bringing in the washing, as suspects can jump over the wall and attack you. Be quick when you are outside and go back into the house, LOCKING the door behind you.
  • Do not leave keys in doors or security gates.
  • If there is a panic button, carry it at all times, preferably where it is not visible.
  • Make sure you always know an emergency number and the address where you are in case of an emergency.
  • DO NOT TRUST ANYONE AND DO NOT GIVE OUT ANY INFORMATION ABOUT THE PROPERTY OR YOUR EMPLOYERS.

24/7 Security Services – info@24-7security.co.za / 011 444 2237

Follow Home Safely

Follow Home Safely

There has been a significant increase in the number of reported follow home robberies that have occurred in various areas in Gauteng.

Here are some security tips that could help you to prevent becoming a victim of follow home robberies or hijacking:

  • Do not wear flashy and expensive watches and jewellery.
  • Always check the rear-view mirror to see if you are being followed.
  • Plan your route and let someone know what your route is and when to expect you to arrive at your destination.
  • Don’t talk on your cell phone when you open your vehicle.
  • Have your key ready but not visible and unlock your car when you are close by.
  • Keep all valuables out of sight.
  • Avoid driving with your windows open and keep the doors locked.
  • If you suspect you are being followed, drive to your nearest police station or a busy public area.
  • When approaching a red traffic light, slow down so that you only reach it when it turns green.
  • If possible, park in a central well-lit area preferably with guards on duty.
  • When stopping behind another vehicle, leave half a vehicle length in front so you can make an emergency escape if necessary.
  • Change your routes and your schedule regularly.
  • Make arriving at your destination safer by calling ahead and asking someone to open and close the gate for you.
  • Make sure you have an emergency number on your cell phone, you need to know who you want to phone in an emergency and dial that number immediately.
  • Try to keep as calm as possible and stay focused on driving to a safe place.
  • Slow down. It is harder to follow somebody that is driving slowly but keeps on moving.
  • Turn your radio down so you are fully aware of your surroundings.
  • Put your headlights on bright and put your hazards on, day or night, as you want to attract as much attention as possible and scare away the would-be robbers/hi-jackers.
  • Do not go home as they will know where you live.
  • Head for a busy place if possible, such as a 24-hour garage, hospital or a police station where it is more difficult to follow you in and where there may be surveillance cameras.

24/7 Security Services – info@24-7security.co.za / 011 444 2237

Emergency Numbers  

JHB011 444 2237
KZN031 140 1061
PTA012 451 8600

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